Barefoot running gains traction - Faster times, fewer injuries, even after a marathon

clan_NEt

Well-Known Member
4 Jun 2011
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Inspired by Christopher McDougall's best-selling book, Born to Run, which chronicles how a tribe of Tarahumara Indians in Mexico run distances exceeding 161km wearing thin sandals, many runners are experimenting with running barefoot or with so-called barefoot shoes, like FiveFingers, by Vibram, which have articulated toes and thin, pliable soles.
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Xfit

Active Member
17 Jul 2011
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[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-iGZPtWXzE]‪Christopher McDougall: Are we born to run?‬‏ - YouTube[/ame]
 

Xfit

Active Member
17 Jul 2011
136
15
28
After watching this video that i realise there is so many different technique to running.. the way you land your feet and stuff. and i tried running barefoot. its not easy actually, cos when i run normally. i land on my back of my feet. But when running on barefoot, you will naturally land on the the front to prevent injury.. its good as i actaully run faster than normal but it really hurts hahhahah
 

YourHand

Member
5 Aug 2011
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i tried barefoot running and regretted it. i got myself the vibrams 5 fingers and switched to the forefoot running technique. i developed shin splints on my right leg and wasn't able to run pretty much this whole year. been through so many doctors, and the advice was 'no fracture', get plenty rest. rested for three months, ran again, the pain is still there. ask me to rest for another 3 months...forget it.

now i just started running @ shorter distances, 3 - 5 km, 3 times per week, still using the forefoot running technique, but with cushioned shoes and shin supports, and i still feel a slight pain in my right shin. if i increase the distance, i know the pain will also increase.

my advice is, try forefoot running because it feels natural, like your feet are paddling/cycling, but don't go barefoot.
 

MalcolmX

Well-Known Member
4 Jul 2011
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all these barefoot running may have gotten artificially hyped up by manufacturers of barefoot-inspired footwear
 

PWiD

Well-Known Member
20 Jul 2011
291
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i tried barefoot running and regretted it. i got myself the vibrams 5 fingers and switched to the forefoot running technique. i developed shin splints on my right leg and wasn't able to run pretty much this whole year. been through so many doctors, and the advice was 'no fracture', get plenty rest. rested for three months, ran again, the pain is still there. ask me to rest for another 3 months...forget it.

now i just started running @ shorter distances, 3 - 5 km, 3 times per week, still using the forefoot running technique, but with cushioned shoes and shin supports, and i still feel a slight pain in my right shin. if i increase the distance, i know the pain will also increase.

my advice is, try forefoot running because it feels natural, like your feet are paddling/cycling, but don't go barefoot.
... What's your weight.
 

YourHand

Member
5 Aug 2011
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... What's your weight.
now that you've mentioned...

my height is 1.8m...i use to weigh between 67kg and 72kg and i ocassionally enter 10km runs and i use to run heel strike.

early last year i have this sudden interest to lift weights and gain muscle.

ran my last race @ the mizhuno 10km run last october...no problems.

switched to barefoot/forefoot running early this year...weight @ 85kg...target is 90-95kg...

not able to enjoy running again till today :(
 

PWiD

Well-Known Member
20 Jul 2011
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Maybe you should lean down before you actually run barefoot.
 

YourHand

Member
5 Aug 2011
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Maybe you should lean down before you actually run barefoot.
maybe you're right, but i'm not going to find out the hard way...meaning lean down, rest my injury, run barefoot only to find out that the pain is still there.
 

PWiD

Well-Known Member
20 Jul 2011
291
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Shin splints are a common condition for a lot of people, even seasoned runners. Just make sure you don't get them via reckless or unadvised training methods. There's a thin line of difference between having permanent stress fractures in the shin and a possible loss of mobility/sensitivity in your legs when you hit 40.
 

roflolmao

Active Member
3 Jun 2011
199
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Running barefoot or with minimalist footwear is only recommended if you have no current pain to speak of; so, if your shin or knee is troubling you, I would recommend that you remain in some supportive running shoes fit for your feet by a professional.

Take the time to make sure you are in the appropriate shoe for your foot and your running stride. Knee pain often results from weakness in the glutes, hip abductors or quadriceps, and may also be a result of an improper shoe.

Additionally, if you have run more than about 800 kilometres on a pair of shoes, the midsole may be so compressed at this point that they are not offering much shock absorption, so your knee is having to take the stress instead of your shoe. If you are unsure as to how old they are/how many miles they are, take them in to a running store and have an employee take a look at them.

In the mean time, make sure you are keeping your glutes, hip abductors, and quads strong (and stretched out after runs) to encourage patella (kneecap) stability.