Article The 4 basic types of stretch techniques

roflolmao

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3 Jun 2011
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Ballistic

The oldest technique is the ballistic stretch which makes use of repetitive bouncing movements. It has been virtually abandoned by almost all experts in the field due to safety concerns.

Dynamic

Dynamic stretching incorporates movements that mimic a specific sport or exercise in an exaggerated yet controlled manner; often include during the warm-up or in preparation for a sports event.

Static :)

The static technique involves passively stretching a muscle to the point of mild discomfort by holding it in a maximal stretch for an extended period. It remains a very effective, relatively safe, and popular method of stretching. Recommendations for the optimal holding time are varied, ranging from 10 seconds to 60 seconds.

PNF (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation)

PNF techniques involve a partner actively stretching the participant by some combination of altering contraction and relaxation of both agonist and antagonist muscles. Some of the different PNF techniques used include slow reversal hold, contract relax, and hold relax. PNF stretching usually involves a 10 second push phase followed by a 10 second relaxation phase, typically repeated a few times. PNF stretching is capable of producing greater improvement in flexibility compared to other techniques. Its disadvantage is that it typically requires a partner, although stretching with a partner may have some motivational advantage for some individuals.
 
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roflolmao

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3 Jun 2011
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Contrary to popular belief, stretching before a workout does not appear to decrease the occurrence of injury. The risk of injury seems to be about equal for those who stretch and those who do not stretch before exercise. The warm-up, not stretching, seems to be the important deterrent for injury, performed before an exercise bout.

Stretching seems to offer more long term benefit such as maintaining functional flexibility and correcting particular muscular imbalances. Improved flexibility may help prevent back and other orthopedic problems.

Individuals with certain muscular imbalances or postural problems can benefits from stretching. Stretching can help maintain flexibility which may otherwise decline with age or inactivity due to an injury.

Stretching may be more safely performed after dynamic exercise, when muscles are warm. Unless an activity requires extreme flexibility, stretching before is probably unnecessary. And even then, stretches should be performed after a warmup.